Chronic Absenteeism

How school climate relates to chronic absence: A multi–level latent profile analysis


Source
Elsevier: Journal of School Psychology

Abstract

Chronic absence is a significant problem in schools. School climate may play an important role in influencing chronic absence rates among schools, yet little research has evaluated how school climate constructs relate to chronic absence. Using multilevel latent profile analysis, we evaluated how profiles of student perceptions of school climate at both the student and school level differentiated school–level rates of chronic absence. Participants included 25,776 middle and high school students from 106 schools who completed a district administered school climate survey. Students attended schools in a large urban school district where 89% of 6th through 12th grade students were African-American and 61% were eligible for the federally subsidized school meals program. Three student–level profiles of perceptions of school climate emerged that corresponded to “positive,” “moderate,” and “negative” climate. Two predominant patterns regarding the distribution of these profiles within schools emerged that corresponded to the two school–level profiles of “marginal climate” and “climate challenged” schools. Students reporting “moderate” and “negative” climate in their schools were more likely to attend schools with higher chronic absence rates than students reporting that their school had “positive” climate. Likewise, “climate challenged” schools had significantly higher chronic absence rates than “marginal climate” schools. These results suggest that school climate shares an important relation with chronic absence among adolescent students attending urban schools. Implications for prevention and intervention programs are discussed. © 2016 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Article Information

Van Eck, Kathryn & Johnson, Stacy & Bettencourt, Amie & Lindstrom Johnson, Sarah. (2016). How school climate relates to chronic absence: A multi–level latent profile analysis. Journal of School Psychology. 61. 10.1016/j.jsp.2016.10.001.

Brief report: Associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among U.S. high school students.


Source
Elsevier: Journal of Adolescence

Abstract

Although associations between bullying and health risk behaviors are well-documented, research on bullying and education-related outcomes, including school attendance, is limited. This study examines associations between bullying victimization (in-person and electronic) and missing school because of safety concerns among a nationally representative sample of U.S. high school students. We used logistic regression analyses to analyze data from the 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey of students in grades 9-12. In-person and electronic victimization were each associated with increased odds of missing school due to safety concerns compared to no bullying victimization. Having been bullied both in-person and electronically was associated with greater odds of missing school compared to electronic bullying only for female students and in-person bullying only for male students. Collaborations between health professionals and educators to prevent bullying may improve school attendance.

Article Information

J Steiner, Riley & Rasberry, Catherine. (2015). Brief report: Associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among U.S. high school students. Journal of Adolescence. 43. 1-4. 10.1016/j.adolescence.2015.05.005.

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