School Safety

The link between school climate and violence in school: A meta-analytic review


Source
Elsevier: Aggression and Violent Behavior

Abstract

There has been significant interest in whether and how school climate and violent behavior are meaningfully related. The present meta-analysis reviewed studies reporting a relationship between school climate and school violence in order to summarize the total effect and the direction of these research findings. Database consultation and literature hand searching yielded 145 articles which were reviewed by two experts. Studies were included if they reported a statistical effect size of the relationship between school climate and school violence. Exclusion criteria were unclear operationalization of the principal variables, research findings from multiple publications, studies using multi-level analysis and qualitative studies. The meta-analysis included 36 independent studies (N = 113,778) with correlations ranging from − .02 to − .53. Using a random-effects model a moderate mean effect size of r = − .26, CI [− 30, − 21] was found. Statistical findings indicated significant heterogeneity and a large range of variance between studies. Meta-regressions analyzed different potential moderators as relevant factors of heterogeneity, but none of these factors could be identified as a moderator. Due to the large variance between the studies, it remains difficult to draw final conclusions. Nevertheless, the moderate effect size underlines the role of environmental aspects for school violence intervention.

Article Information

Steffgen, Georges & recchia, sophie & Viechtbauer, Wolfgang. (2013). The link between school climate and violence in school: A meta-analytic review. Aggression and Violent Behavior. 18. 300-309. 10.1016/j.avb.2012.12.001.

Supportive school climate and student willingness to seek help for bullying and threats of violence


Source
Elsevier: Journal of School Psychology

Abstract

This study investigated the relations between student perceptions of support and student willingness to seek help for bullying and threats of violence in a sample of 7318 ninth-grade students from 291 high schools who participated in the Virginia High School Safety Study. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that students who perceived their teachers and other school staff to be supportive were more likely to endorse positive attitudes toward seeking help for bullying and threats of violence. In schools with more perceived support, there was less of a discrepancy in help-seeking attitudes between girls and boys. Findings suggest that efforts by school staff to provide a supportive climate are a potentially valuable strategy for engaging students in the prevention of bullying and threats of violence.

Article Information

Eliot, M., Cornell, D.G., Gregory, A.E., & Fan, X. (2010). Supportive school climate and student willingness to seek help for bullying and threats of violence. Journal of school psychology, 48 6, 533-53.

The Association Between the School Climate and School Discipline Policies in Rhode Island Public Schools


Source
The University of Rhode Island: Digital Commons

Abstract

Exclusionary discipline practices are associated with a range of negative student outcomes, both academic and behavioral, as well as a higher likelihood of laterschool drop-out and involvement in the juvenile justice system. Alternatively, more positive school climate has been associated with a variety of favorable student outcomes including higher levels of academic achievement and fewer behavioral infractions. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between school climate and exclusionary discipline practices and policies in the Rhode Island public elementary and secondary schools. More specifically the study sought to investigate the association between teacher and student perceptions of school climate and variations in the number of in-school suspensions (ISS), out-of-school suspensions (OSS), and alternative placement programs (APP). Additionally, we examined whether school discipline policies, that is more reactive or more proactive policies, were associated with school climate and discipline practices and whether the type of policy moderated the relationship between school climate and school discipline practices.

Data from 261 elementary and secondary schools were included. Measures of teacher and student ratings of school climate, school discipline practices (i.e., suspensions and alternative program placements) and demographic variables were publicly available through the Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE) through their website InfoWorks!. School discipline policies were publicly available via school and school district website and analyzed using content analysis...

Article Information

Lubiner, Anna G., "THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SCHOOL CLIMATE AND SCHOOL DISCIPLINE POLICIES AND PRACTICES IN RHODE ISLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS" (2015). Open Access Dissertations. Paper 360. http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/oa_diss/360

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